Urban challenges[edit]

Language in Rio de Janeiro


Ben F. Bagley

Living in Brazil, from the UK

"The offline get-together in Rio really convinced me of InterNations. It is so much more than just an online plattform. "

Marielle Depois

Living in Brazil, from Canada

"What I really like about InterNations? It makes meeting other expat women in a pleasant atmosphere so easy."

Rio de Janeiro at a Glance

Many expats dream about moving to Rio de Janeiro to experience the colorful carnival season, the sunshine, and the outgoing people. But before you get ready for moving to Rio de Janeiro, read our guide and learn more about the city’s history, climate, visa requirements, and housing.

History of Rio de Janeiro

Portuguese explorers began moving to Rio de Janeiro in 1502. As they thought the bay at which they landed was the mouth of a river, they named the city “River of January”. However, it took until 1530 for colonization to begin, which was closely followed by a serious conflict with the French who were also trying to seize the area.

The first people moving to Rio de Janeiro settled in the district which today is known as Castle Hill. From there, the city developed into a popular port, especially after gold was discovered in the late seventeenth century. In 1822, the country gained its independence from Portugal, following which the state was eventually transformed from a Monarchy into a Republic. Rio de Janeiro was declared the country’s capital and remained so until the inauguration of Brasilia as the capital in 1960.

Geography and Climate

Any expat moving to Rio de Janeiro will immediately notice two things: being the second largest city in Brazil, its colossal size, and the tourists. The city is located at the Atlantic coast on an inlet in Guanabara Bay, at the foot of the Sugarloaf, a 1, 300 foot tall mountain at the entrance of the bay. Rio de Janeiro is also often referred to as “the Marvelous City”.



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Is Brazil really that dangerous? | Yahoo Answers

I've heard from the Lonely Planet Brazil travel guide that cities like Rio De Janeiro and Sao Paulo are crime ridden cities. Based on your experiences (if you have been to Brazil), what can you say about this issue? How do you survive those bad hangovers criminals give you? Any suggestions? Thanks!

I've heard from the Lonely Planet Brazil travel guide that cities like Rio De Janeiro and Sao Paulo are crime ridden cities. Based on your experiences (if you have been to Brazil), what can you say about this issue? How do you survive those bad hangovers criminals give you? Any suggestions? Thanks!




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